The end of oil

I’m not a political person.  I don’t typically engage in political conversations.  Or even read about them in the newspaper.   But once again the end of oil is making an appearance.  It’s like the Lindsay Lohan of the business pages.  It sells.

But it’s unjust.

For too long we’ve relied on oil.  For too long we’ve relied on people who can’t even afford a car to use the oil that their own country produces to provide it for us.

Once again it’s the same old poor us, what are we going to do if the price of oil increases?  How will it impact the stock market? Transportation industries? Oil is always a main focus point when discussing the recovering economies of our “developed” nations.

Hold on.  What about the economies of the so-called “developing” nations that supply us with our oil?  The people in oil-rich countries who are protesting their governments (and in some cases dying) for reasons like unemployment. Education. Health-care.  They have no investments, not even in the oil companies located within their own country.

Perhaps it’s time we demand the government of our “developed” nations to implement a better public transportation system.  Or to support leading-edge research and development in alternative energies.  And let the big automakers fall flat instead of bailing them out with public dollars since it seems they refuse to produce cars that do not rely on oil.

While I don’t live in an oil-producing country, I can say that many people in this “developing” nation don’t have cars.  So we walk.  Cycle.  Use scooters. Take a bus.  Or rely on collective taxis, a large taxi that does a circuit and stops and picks up people along the way as space permits.  It’s brilliant.

And the food, well we eat what’s in season.  Seeing a cart full of fruits and vegetables pulled by a mule is a regular site here.

In my apartment, we have no fancy stove or hot water heater, we have propane tanks. When we want to take a shower, we turn on the propane tank and heat up the water.  The central heating system does not exist.  We have blankets and add extra layers.

It’s practical. And “developing”.

One thought on “The end of oil

  1. Pingback: On children « Why Morocco

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